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The Back-Story on Read Right

August 9, 2018
The Back-Story on Read Right

By Dee Tadlock, PhD

Why was Read Right Developed–and How

Read Right, a fundamentally different approach to reading intervention, is grounded in theoretical constructs that challenge mainstream thinking in the field of reading. It was developed as a result of a mother’s determination to help her son. I had just completed a PhD in education with a major in reading when my younger son started first grade. It soon became apparent that he was having extreme difficulty learning to read. Armed with the knowledge of how to help struggling readers that I had attained in my doctoral studies, I worked diligently to help him—to no avail. When school district personnel suggested he be tested for learning disabilities and, if qualified, transferred to a different elementary school that housed the LD program, I asked to observe the instruction that was occurring in the classroom. Spending a day in the school, watching competent educators doing virtually the same kind of instruction I and his first grade teacher had been pursuing, resulted in my refusing the special program. I didn’t want to send my son away from a teacher he loved and all his friends to attend a program that I knew wouldn’t work—both his first grade teacher and I had already done everything I saw happening in that LD classroom.Read More

Hidden Benefits of Workplace Literacy

August 7, 2018
Hidden Benefits of Workplace Literacy

BY DEE TADLOCK, PH.D.

Many years ago, when I was employed by a community college, a young Vietnamese man, Nha, Became my student. His tenacity, talent, and courage in the face of extreme hardship and seemingly insurmountable odds was inspiring to me personally, and we became friends. He had been trying for three years to cut through an incredible bureaucratic tangle in order to bring his four sisters, mother, and father from Vietnam to live in the United states. I committed to help him. The two of us gathered information, strategized, and worked for another three years to make his dream happen.

In the meantime, I had moved, as had he. Nevertheless, soon after his family members were settled in their new home in the US, he drove his four sisters, his mother, and his father 80 miles to visit me in my home. They brought along as a special gift of love an array of exotic Vietnamese dishes–a veritable feast. One of Nha’s sisters is an accomplished musician on a Vietnamese 16-string instrument. She mesmerized each of us with her sensitive interpretation of traditional and modern Vietnamese music. “I prefer the sad songs,” she said in her tentative English. “They speak of the pain and the hurt in my country.”Read More